Culture and beauty tradition

April 2013
In China, while the definition of beauty has changed over time, a number of ideals and notions of attractiveness endure

On site Tsuya Skin looks created by Shu uemura make-up artist

In many Asian countries, beauty is more than skin deep and could be an expression of one's health, character, social status and so on. © L'Oréal

On site Tsuya Skin looks created by Shu uemura make-up artist

In many Asian countries, beauty is more than skin deep and could be an expression of one's health, character, social status and so on. © L'Oréal

In China, while the definition of beauty has changed over the centuries, a number of time-honored notions of attractiveness endure. For instance, a luminous complexion and an oval face, a slender waist, supple delicate arms, legs and fingers, as well as long, smooth hair are generally coveted.

Like in many Asian countries, skin care is an obsession among Chinese women and 70% of their beauty consumption is funneled into skin care1. The concept of layering several skin care products, morning and night, is also common in countries like Japan and Korea. Although “homemade” beauty recipes using natural ingredients still have some sway, modern beauty care backed by extensive scientific research has become increasingly popular. Chinese women are especially fond of high-end brands synonymous with quality, good taste and efficacy, while urban men are increasingly appearance-conscious. For affluent and aspiring Chinese customers, beauty is also a portal into luxury goods because they are less expensive and more widely available.

1 Source: Engaging Affluent Chinese Through Beauty Products by Patricia Pao

Did you know?

 

1/ The Four Great Beauties are four Chinese women from ancient times renowned for their beauty. They lived in four different dynasties, each hundreds of years apart. In chronological order, they are: Xi Shi (c. 7th to 6th century BC, Spring and Autumn Period), Wang Zhaojun (c. 1st century BC, Western Han Dynasty), Diaochan (c. 3rd century, Late Eastern Han/Three Kingdoms period) and Yang Guifei (719–756, Tang Dynasty).

2/ Unlike European women, Asian women like light, “moist” textures even if the product is sticky for a few moments after application.

3/ Chinese women often use traditional massage motions during their skin care routines. They do not spread the lotions onto their face, they help them penetrate by delicately tapping their cheeks, forehead and chin with their palms. L’Oréal has adapted its skin care lines to these rituals.